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Replacement/Retrofit Window Terminology

Here are some basic window terms that will help you better understand replacing your windows.


Head Jamb- Groove at the top of the window which allows the window sashes to slide into place and seat inside the window frame.

Upper Sash- The top portion of the window comprised of a pane of glass set inside a frame. Is fixed in a single hung window and slides up and down in a double hung window.

Glass Pane- In the window shown at right there are two panes of glass, one in the top sash and one in the bottom sash.

Side Jamb- Grooves in window that allows the window sashes to slide up and down or side to side.

Trim- The trim extends beyond the end of the window frame on the outside of the window. This allows the window to fit flush with the exterior wall when the window in installed.

Stop: A wood trim member nailed to the window frame to hold, position or separate window parts.  The stop is often molded into the jamb liners on sliding windows.

Lower Sash- The bottom portion of the window comprised of a pane of glass set inside a frame. Is fixed in a single hung window and slides up and down in a double hung window.

Sill- Located at the very bottom of the window, the sill is usually sloped to allow water to run off the bottom of the window in rain or during cleaning.

Flush Fin window- A replacement window with flush fin is used when replacing an existing aluminum sliding window. This is the most commonly used replacement window type.

Block Frame window- A block frame window is used when replacing the wood sash of an old double hung wood window.

Sloped Sill Adapter- A sloped sill adapter is used to cover the gap between the old sloped sill window and the new block frame window. It adapts a new window to the existing sloping sill.

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